4th string root chords

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 Guitar Scales and guitar chords

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The illustrations to follow will outline guitar scales and chords that are directly related to each other. By no means is this a complete list of chords for each scale, but the basic chords. The purpose of this lesson is to get an idea for the chords that can be played for each of the scales listed.

Each scale below is an A type of scale either major, minor, diminished or augmented. You will need to play each scale and learn the different sounds each create. Once you learn the scales, you play each chord and see how they relate to the scale outlined.

The Dorian mode is a also called the minor 7 scale. Notice the chords that work well with this mode. Strum the Am chord and then play the A Dorian mode in the suggested position in tab below. Repeat this process with each of the scales illustrated.Once you learn each scale/mode, move them to other keys. To do this, you would use the same fingering patterns, but move to a different position. For example, the A Dorian mode starts at the 5th fret; by moving this same fingering pattern to the 7th fret, you would have the B Dorian mode. The chords would then be Bm Bm7 Bm6 Bm9. This works for all the scales and chords.4th String Root Guitar Chords.

The Chords illustrated below are chords that are formed by the note on the 4th string. Although the Low E string and the A string have an (X) which means don't play, you can play the open A string for the A chords illustrated. Look at the 1st illustration below. It shows the chord formed at the 5th fret. Notice the A note at the 7th fret (4th string or the D string). This illustration shows how to play the A chord. But by moving this chord either up or down the fretboard, you can play other chords.

Dorian Mode

Ionian guitar mode

Mixolydian guitar mode

Guitar scales

4th String Root Guitar Chords

The Chords illustrated below are chords that are formed by the note on the 4th string. Although the Low E string and the A string have an (X) which means don't play, you can play the open A string for the A chords illustrated. Look at the 1st illustration below. It shows the chord formed at the 5th fret. Notice the A note at the 7th fret (4th string or the D string). This illustration shows how to play the A chord. But by moving this chord either up or down the fretboard, you can play other chords.

Guitar Secrets, Guitar Chords

The image to the left shows you how to play the A chord by starting on the 4th string. Notice the A note in yellow to the left. This is the root for the A chord. The notes of the A chord are, A, C# and E. You can move this fingering pattern to play other chords and use the same fingering pattern. If you moved this fingering pattern two frets higher, you could play the B major chord at the 7th fret, look at the next illustration below.

   

Guitar Secrets, Guitar Chords

Look to the left, notice the fingering pattern is now at the 7th fret. This would be the B major chord. Notice the root note on the D string is now on the B note 9th fret. It's now the B major chord.

   

Guitar Secrets, Guitar Chords

Look to the left, notice the fingering pattern is now at the 8th fret. This would be the C major chord. Notice the root note on the D string is now on the C note 10th fret. You can move all the fingering patterns below to play all the chords.

 
All the chords illustrated below show how to play only A chords. A major, A minor, A dim and so on. But you can move these chords around to play in other keys. By moving  the finger patterns below down two frets you would be playing all G type chords. Move everything two frets higher and you would be playing the B type of chords. The root of each chord is found on the 4th string, this would be the D string.

Notice that all the notes on the D string below are A notes. It is recommended that you learn how to play all these chords using a different root note. Move the root note up and down the fretboard and figure out the other chords as you move. You can use the
blank guitar fret board illustrations to come up with your own chords.

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This should keep you busy for a while.

Good luck,

Guitar Secrets