Cadence and Guitar Progressions

Guitar Secrets Lead Guitar Made Easy

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Modulation    Modulation 2   Modulation 5   Cadence

Cadence

We will now advance one step closer to modulation. By now you should be up on the pentatonic scale in every position. It is vital to know this scale in every position and in as many different keys as possible. Of course this all takes time to accomplish, but to be in total control of your instrument you must understand it.

You should also be up on the major scale and it’s relative minor. To understand modulation, you must become familiar with all the major diatonic scales and the chords within each scale. Once you understand the diatonic major scales and each relative minor scale, we will advance onto other scales (harmonic and melodic) and modulation.

Before we move on to modulation, we must understand the functions of each chord in the diatonic scale. We will continue to work with the key of C major and its relative minor or Aeolian scale Am.

The notes and chords in the key of C major are C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and B diminished. In our earlier lessons I touched on cadence. In that lesson each note in the key of C major was given a name.

The first note in each key is the home note and is also referred to as the tonic or final. The second note is called the Super tonic. You will find each note and the name illustrated below, all the notes in the key of C major and the names that will be associated with them.

 

C major and scale, Guitar modes of the key of C major I     C Tonic The first note in the key, referred to as the home note or final.

ii   Dm Supertonic

iii   Em Mediant

IV F Subdominant

V   G Dominant

vi  Am sub Mediant

vii B diminished Leading tone

 

If you are playing in the key of C major and strum the C chord (I), it is said to be at rest or inactive. In other words, when this chord is played, it does not demand resolution. Notice the notes of the C chord below. The notes that make up the C chord are C, E and G. Notice that none of those notes have an arrow pointing to another note. Now notice the D, F, A and B notes below, each of these notes have an arrow pointing to another note. For example the D note is pointing to the C note, the F note is pointing to the E note, the A to G and B to C. This means that the notes with the arrows are active notes and want to resolve to the notes they are pointing to.

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