Melody construction

Guitar Secrets Lead Guitar Made Easy

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Lead Guitar Made Easy

Melody construction.

In this lesson, you learn how to build melodies. You can come up with an endless amount of melodic patterns using this technique. If your interested in learning more about this, I have invented a very easy technique to accomplish this. I call it my secret technique to creating melodies and scale runs. By using my technique, you can come up with your own melodies and scale runs with easy step by step instructions. It has been included in our Gold Level Members Section. You really should be a Gold Level Member.

We start things off by using 4 guitar chords. In this example, we will use the D, Bm G and Em chords, look below.

   D F# A    B D F#    G B D

E BG

 

Exercise 1

The image above shows what the music notation would look like for exercise 1. The notes and chords in the key of D major are as follows: D Em F#m G A Bm C#dim and D.

The illustration below shows the notes in the key of D major in the second position. This would be starting at the 2nd fret. What you need to do, is compare each note shown in the tablature below, to the notes in the fret-board illustration. Figure out want notes are being played. For example, in the tablature below, the first note played is the (5) this is the E note at the 5th fret.

What you need to do, is play the 4 notes and then strum each chord in the illustration above. The first chord is the D chord. Play the 4 notes in that measure and then strum the D chord. Do the same thing for each measure and strum the indicated chord. The 4 chords you need to play are the D Bm G and Em chords. These chords have been shown above. When you strum the chords above, notice how the notes being played in the tablature sound nice. Notice that the chords being played are a sixth note apart. 

D to B   /B to G   /G to E. The next chord you could play after the Em would be the C#dim.

All of this is what you call melodic patterns. You can come up with an almost infinite amount of different melodic patterns.

Let's look at one more example. For our first pattern, I will pick 4 notes at random in the key of D major. For our first pattern, say we pick the D F# E D notes. This will be our main idea to build on. From here, we increase each note by a 3rd. 

This melodic pattern will be in 3rds. 

Once again the notes in the key of D major are: D E F# G A B C#  -   D E F# G A B C# D. 

Our 1st main melodic pattern will have these notes (D F# E D). Now we must create the next pattern. To do this we increase our first pattern by a 3rd for each note. So if we increase each note in our first melodic pattern,  we would have the notes of our second pattern. (F# A G F#). Now we need to create our next pattern. We increase each of the previous notes by a 3rd. (A C# B A). Then we repeat this again. (C# E D C#). So far we have 4 melodic patterns. (D F# E D) (F# A G F#) (A C# B A) (C# E D C#). We can now put these in tablature form.

Like I said, you can come up with an endless amount of melodic patterns using this technique. If your interested in learning more about this, I have invented a very easy technique to accomplish this. I call it, my secret technique to creating melodies and scale runs. By using my technique, you can come up with your own melodies and scale runs with easy step by step instructions. It has been included in the Lead Guitar Made Easy downloadable lessons.

This lesson just touched on melodic patterns and could go on forever. You need to learn the notes and chords of each scale and lay them out on a blank fret-board. Once you do this, you can visualize each chord and scale pattern. Pick a few notes out of the scale and increase each by a 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th or what ever. Mix them up and transpose them to different keys. Eventually you will build up an enormous amount of patterns you can call up and play without even thinking about it.

Good luck,

Guitar Secrets

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